Saturday, 28 February 2015

Float Toronto, Toronto, ON

I took a walk around our 'hood last Saturday and discovered Float Toronto on Queen Street W (at Beaconsfield).


I'd heard about floating and was intrigued about it.

Floatation therapy, also known as floating, floatation, sensory deprivation, or R.E.S.T (Restricted Environmental Stimulation Therapy) involves lying in a salt-water solution in a spacious tank. It is one of the most effective means of stress relief and relaxation available. Now widely accepted as a legitimate therapy, floatation is also used to treat a wide range of ailments and conditions and has been proven to lower cortisol levels (the stress hormone). The term sensory deprivation is often used as the environment is designed to limit sensory input and allow your body to fully relax.

Your ears (with earplugs in) stay just below the water; the tanks are insulated against sound leaving you in peaceful silence.  After you shut the door and turn off the light, you float in total darkness – you won’t notice a difference between keeping your eyes open or closed.  Inside the tank, you’ll find 10 inches of water and 900 lbs. of dissolved Epsom salts – a solution that allows you to float effortlessly. The water and air are both kept at 34.1C – this is skin-receptor neutral, which means that when you fully relax, you lose track of where your body ends and the water or air begins. During your float, the outside world is gone and amazing things happen. It turns out that when you’re not fighting gravity or receiving sensory input, your body has a lot of extra resources at its disposal. Your mind is free to navigate without distraction, your brain pumps out dopamine and endorphins, and the parasympathetic nervous system gets to work helping you rest, de-stress and heal. It’s likely to be the most relaxing thing you’ve ever experienced.

Gord and I made an appointment for noon today.

You can have some tea or water afterwards
You can relax in the lounge
That's a lotta salt!

There are five rooms individual rooms with a floatation tank and a shower ... they have everything you need including ear plugs, shampoo, conditioner, etc.

You shower before and after
Helps to get any salt out of your ears

Micha was friendly and helpful and showed us what to do.

The inside of the tank is 4 feet wide and 8 feet long

Inside the tank, it's dark ... you really can't see the difference between opening or closing your eyes.  The water was nice and warm and because of all the salt, you really do float.  I found the air a bit stuffy at first so I jammed a towel so the door would stay open just a crack to let some cool air in.  After a while, though, I got chilly and I closed the door 100%.  I was okay with the complete darkness.

Gord is lucky that he's able to go into what I call "Gordland" and tune out and into himself.  I can't and was unable to turn my brain off.  It was weird too not having any sense of time ... did I have 10 minutes left or 30 minutes left?  Music comes on to let you know when it's over.  Then you get out and shower.

Though it was enjoyable, when it was over I wasn't sure I'd do it again.  It wasn't until about a half hour later that I experienced the benefit.  My body felt incredibly relaxed and similar to how I feel after a massage.

Gord and I have each bought three more sessions and are going again next Sunday!

1 comment:

Lady Banana said...

I've thought about doing this but wondered if I'd feel a bit claustrophobic..

Plus like you I'd probably have difficulty switching my brain off!